19 May '11, 5pm

The man who thinks Manhattan isn’t dense enough | Grist

I just finished Mr. Glaeser's book a couple of days ago and found myself troubled by some of the same points Mr. Benfield raises. In my heart-of-hearts, however, I admit that it's a challenge when someone puts forth arguments that are strong (and many of Glaeser's arguments are strong) but contrary to my assumptions and/or beliefs. If I am honest with myself, I can argue both sides of several of his positions. Yes, it would be better for the planet if the population density (not just the population) of Santa Clara County were bigger -- as long as the increase was matched by improvements in mass transit, public space, and amenities. On the other hand, if we merely build more and, thereby reduce purchase or lease costs for dwellings, people are likely to flock to places with good employment prospects and climate. Thus, an unbalanced sort of density increase might well worsen...

Full article: http://www.grist.org/urbanism/2011-05-19-the-man-who-thin...

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Ed Glaeser's #urbanism on steroids needs a little context- efficiency isn't everything: #smartgrowth #urbanplanning

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switchboard.nrdc.org 19 May '11, 1pm

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