15 May '11, 12pm

Scientists alarmed by diseased fish in the Gulf

I spent my summers, 45 years ago, in Grand Isle Louisiana fishing, crabbing and swimming in the Gulf of Mexico. The offshore oil rigs, sound of the crew boats, flares and sandy tar balls on the beaches seemed a natural part of the environment in those days. The best fishing was always found at the oil rigs which support a rich community of ocean life around the legs of the platforms. It is still common to motor out 60 miles in a fast boat, tie a bow line to the leg of a rig and fish the structure for red snapper. I was able to make a brief visit to Grand Isle two months before the BP rig went down in flames. We stopped at the public jetty, actually the remains of the old wooden bridge, as we left the island. Several families were lazily fishing, a young girl excitedly pointed to the floping, flounder that her father had just landed. The bay was filled with brown pelicans a...

Full article: http://climateprogress.org/2011/05/15/scientists-alarmed-...

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