12 May '11, 3am

First signs of progress in saving Indian vultures from killer drug: The ban on a veterinary drug which caused an...

First signs of progress in saving Indian vultures from killer drug: The ban on a veterinary drug which caused an...

White-rumped Vulture (J C Eames) The ban on a veterinary drug which caused an unprecedented decline in Asian vulture populations has shown the first signs of progress, according to scientists. However, the recovery of the wild vulture populations requires efforts to see the drug completely removed from the birds’ food supply. In a new study, published in science journal, PLoS ONE, researchers report measurements of the prevalence and concentration of diclofenac in carcasses of domesticated cattle in India, made before and after the implementation of a ban on its veterinary use. The governments of India, Nepal and Pakistan banned veterinary use of the painkiller diclofenac in 2006 because of its lethal effects on vultures that feed on the carcasses of cattle and buffaloes that had been treated with the drug shortly before they died. The study shows that the proportion of ca...

Full article: http://www.birdlife.org/community/2011/05/first-signs-of-...

Tweets

Cambodia's wildlife pioneer: saving species and places in Southeast Asia's

Cambodia's wildlife pioneer: saving species and...

news.mongabay.com 11 May '11, 9pm

In February 2011, the Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen approved a 20,400 hectare concession to United Khmer Group for this...

Short film highlights environmental damage caus...

birdlife.org 11 May '11, 7am

In the short film, Peter is persuaded by his friend Jane to stop growing his favourite food crop (potatoes) in his garden ...