03 Jun '11, 10pm

Decline in bat populations costs the U.S. $22.9 billion a year, mostly through losses from agriculture

Decline in bat populations costs the U.S. $22.9 billion a year, mostly through losses from agriculture

If you were to drive across the border from, say, Kentucky to Indiana, you'd see a big sign hanging there to welcome you. But bats flying through the sky encounter no such marker -- not that it would make any difference if they did. The flying mammals go wherever they please, and these days as they zip from one state to another, many are carrying with them some seriously dangerous cargo: Geomyces destructans , the fuzz that causes the mysterious white-nose syndrome, has already killed bats in 18 states. Following the publication earlier this year of a report in the journal Science that estimates the cost of the bat loss to the United States at $22.9 billion a year (mostly through losses from agriculture), the federal government is finally getting serious about the disease. In late May, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a plan that comes at the white-nose scourge ...

Full article: http://www.onearth.org/blog/at-bat-federal-government-ste...

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biologicaldiversity.org 24 May '11, 8pm

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