25 May '11, 10pm

Turbid Waters Surround New Zealand: Sediment and phytoplankton create bright swirls of color in this image of...

Runoff from heavy rains, combined with wave action along the coast, increased the turbidity of New Zealand’s waters when this image was acquired on April 29, 2011. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this view of sediment flowing in the Pacific Ocean. The volume of sediment in the water hints at rough seas. Distinctive plumes arise from pulsing rivers, while the halo of turquoise around both islands is likely sediment swept up to the ocean surface by powerful waves. The plumes fan out and fade from tan to green and blue with water depth and distance from the shore. Cook Strait, the narrow strip of water separating the North and South Islands of New Zealand, has a reputation for being among the world’s roughest stretches of water. The islands lie within the “Roaring Forties,” a belt of winds that circles the globe arou...

Full article: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=50555&s...

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Beautiful emerald & blue swirls glimpsed in New...

earthobservatory.nasa.gov 26 May '11, 12pm

Runoff from heavy rains, combined with wave action along the coast, increased the turbidity of New Zealand’s waters when t...

largest #fish shows Mexican waters importance #whale #shark #ecotour via @locogringocom Here's a pic

largest #fish shows Mexican waters importance #...

earthtimes.org 28 May '11, 7pm

Scientists have recorded the world's largest gathering of whale sharks – the largest fish in the seas – who have got toget...