24 Apr '11, 6am

While many of us are recovering from Easter celebrations it's a good time to highlight Australia's alternative to...

While many of us are recovering from Easter celebrations it's a good time to highlight Australia's alternative to...

A powerful digger, the greater bilby makes spiral-shaped burrows up to three metres long and almost two metres deep. The reason they are so deep is to keep them safe from predators, and also to keep them at a constant temperature of 23 degrees Celsius. The bilby stays in its burrow during the day, looking for food well after dark. A bilby may have up to a dozen burrows—some for sleeping in and the others for escaping into. When returning to the burrow after a night of foraging, the bilby back-fills the burrow to prevent predators from entering. The burrow contains no nesting material and the entrance is often against a termite mound or small shrub.

Full article: http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/wildlife-ecosystems/wildlife/t...

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Endangered Easter Bunnies??

Endangered Easter Bunnies??

climateprogress.org 24 Apr '11, 12pm

National Wildlife Federation : “While I’m not one to despoil the fantasies of children by pointing out this weekend’s spok...

Australia's carbon emissions rising

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earthtimes.org 24 Apr '11, 1pm

As the Australian economy recovers from the economic slowdown of 2009, the levels of carbon dioxide emissions have also ri...