01 Apr '11, 10pm

Is a Pesticide Harming All Those Bees?

Mike Albans for The New York Times Bees in a healthy hive in the hills near Missoula, Mont. For several years, Tom Theobald, a beekeeper in Boulder, Colo., has been trying to check out his suspicions that a relatively new class of pesticides has been interfering with the normal breeding and development of his stock. The pesticides, based on the chemistry of nicotine, are generically called neonicotinoids. They are applied to seeds of crops like corn and soybeans. When the plants grow, the pesticides, which have been marketed under the names Clothianidin and Imidacloprid, permeate all of the plants’ systems. Mr. Theobald discovered, and later reported , that the pesticides had been banned in Italy and in Germany, the home country of their manufacturer, Bayer, which reaps hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue annually from their sale. Yet the Environmental Protection Ag...

Full article: http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/04/01/is-a-pesticide-...

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Green: Is a Pesticide Harming All Those Bees?

green.blogs.nytimes.com 01 Apr '11, 10pm

Mike Albans for The New York Times Bees in a healthy hive in the hills near Missoula, Mont. For several years, Tom Theobal...

Should some pesticides be banned to protect bees?

grist.org 07 Apr '11, 12am

Now, to me, Pettis' testimony is a ringing endorsement for a ban on neonicotinoids. Think about his three factors. "Poor n...

Bees May Be "Entombing" Their Own Hives to Escape Pesticides #bees #beekeeping

Bees May Be "Entombing" Their Own Hives to Esca...

treehugger.com 06 Apr '11, 1pm

"This is a novel finding, and very striking. The implication is that the bees are sensing [pesticides] and actually sealin...