28 Nov '11, 4am

Stormy Waters: National Geographic’s David Doubilet, Part II

Here's a good example of a photographic boundary. For years, as long as I worked for National Geographic , I would or somebody else would propose a story on nudibranchs . These are basically sea-going snails without a shell that develop the most incredible colors in the world as a matter of survival. They feed on very toxic things and then advertise the fact that they are toxic by incorporating this toxicity into their flesh, changing their color. There are so many ways that these creatures are able to survive, but they're snails. And if you want to do a story on these things, you have to first understand what they look like and you have to have some kind of intimacy to them. In other words, you have to be eye to eye with them. Because they live on the ocean bottom, most photographers photograph them looking down on them. It's a little like taking pictures of children and ...

Full article: http://earthjustice.org/blog/2011-november/stormy-waters-...

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