23 Nov '11, 3pm

Video: In drought-stricken Texas, a war against the invasive salt cedar

To view this content, you must have Javascript enabled in your browser preferences. You will also need to download the latest Flash Player . In an e360 video, journalist Jon Brand reports on the controversy over the tamarisk tree, or salt cedar, which has been a fixture in West Texas since the late 1800s, when settlers imported it from the Mediterranean. As salt cedar has spread throughout the southwestern U.S., it has been vilified as a water-sucking menace in an already arid region. States in the Southwest spend millions of dollars each year on pesticides and herbivorous beetles to control salt cedar. Now, however, studies suggest that salt cedar uses up no more water than native species and that the spread of salt cedar is largely due to changes in hydrology caused by building dams and irrigation canals. This video explores both sides of the debate over salt cedar and e...

Full article: http://e360.yale.edu/feature/video_in_drought_stricken_so...

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