05 Sep '11, 11am

Hawaiian Black-Necked Stilt - Where wetlands are protected, endangered shorebirds are making a comeback.

Hawaiian Black-Necked Stilt - Where wetlands are protected, endangered shorebirds are making a comeback.

Photo By: Alan Wilson / American Bird Conservancy Hawaiian birds are among the most endangered in the United States, because their unique adaptations to life on the islands, developed over millions of years of isolation, has made them vulnerable to predators, habitat changes and competition from invasive species, among other threats. But there's good news for three shorebirds, the Hawaiian common moorhen, the Hawaiian coot and the Hawaiian black-necked stilt (pictured here). While all three have been on the Endangered Species List for more than 40 years, all three are gaining in population according to a new study by scientists from Tufts University, the University of Connecticut, and the University of Aberdeen. Not surprisingly, the populations are on the rise on islands that have protected wetland habitat (Oah'u and Kaua'i) but not islands that have not (Hawai'i and Maui...

Full article: http://www.thedailygreen.com/weird-weather/weather-catego...

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