19 Jul '11, 8pm

What’s the legal status of a country that gets swallowed by the ocean?

By the end of this century, it's likely that at least a handful of island nations will find out what it means to become a "deterritorialized" state, writes Rosemary Rayfuse in the Times . When the last bit of Nauru , or Tuvalu, or Kiribati disappear under the waves, it will be a double whammy for their displaced citizens, who could lose control of the vast maritime zones extending from their shores. By law these zones, rich in fish and other natural resources, can extend for hundreds of miles from the shores of a sovereign nation. In addition to losing their homes, it is possible these citizens could lose a great deal else -- their sovereignty, for example, if they're forced to merge with another country. History has a few examples of other deterritorialized states -- Vatican City, the Knights of Malta -- so it's possible international law will be modified to accommodate t...

Full article: http://www.grist.org/list/2011-07-19-whats-the-legal-stat...

Tweets

Another legal aid provider bites the dust | Susan Steed on the fate of the Immigration Advisory Service

Another legal aid provider bites the dust | Sus...

neweconomics.org 18 Jul '11, 11am

Should we worry about the fact that within a year two of the biggest and most widely respected organisations providing imm...

Google is looking for a Philippine Country Manager

google.com.sg 18 Jul '11, 5am

Country Manager (Philippines) - Singapore Add to job cart This position is based in Singapore The area: Advertising Sales ...

Google Gets Chance To Appeal In Street View Law...

searchengineland.com 19 Jul '11, 5pm

Just a couple weeks after the latest setback, Google picked up a small but potentially important victory today in its defe...

A Dow Jones Index for ocean health? Could be co...

conservation.org 16 Jul '11, 10am

We know the ocean's health is under threat...but how bad is it? And how will we know if our actions to help the ocean are ...

Rising Ocean Levels A Long Term Problem:

Rising Ocean Levels A Long Term Problem:

planetsave.com 18 Jul '11, 9am

A new study has shown that not only does melting ice contribute more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion, but that...