28 Feb '18, 2am

"A Stargazer’s Guide to Protected Dark Skies" via @Sierra_Magazine: https://t.co/K1vZ8BLhrl

"A Stargazer’s Guide to Protected Dark Skies" via @Sierra_Magazine: https://t.co/K1vZ8BLhrl

In December, the International Dark-Sky Association designated more than 1,400 square miles of Idaho’s Sawtooth Wilderness as the United States’ first dark-sky reserve. Like dark-sky parks, reserves protect the night skies with light-pollution controls, though they also include pristine “core” dark zones, which makes them even rarer. Central Idaho’s reserve is one of only 12 in the world. Dark-sky ordinances require shields atop street and residential lights around the reserve's periphery. But in the core, rugged terrain has warded off development and human-made light is practically nonexistent. By day, visitors enjoy vistas of the Rockies and their glacial lakes and perennial snow fields. By night, stargazers marvel at interstellar dust clouds, where our galaxy’s planets and stars are born.

Full article: https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/stargazer-s-guide-prote...

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